Don’t Forget about Trace in Smart Office

One of the useful little things that I keep on forgetting to talk about is, don’t forget about Trace.

Trace is handy if you want to step through the what a user is doing and the classes that M3 is using for a process. It’s quite interesting and can be useful especially when you are stepping through Web Service creation.

So if I open OIS300 and go to Tools -> Trace. Then click on Start and right click on an order and go Open Related -> Order Lines

And you can see the “User Interaction: Option 15” and then the various classes that get loaded going in to OIS100 & OIS101.

Pretty kewl really!

But wait, there’s more!

Select the Dyna tab and hit stop. Add a line to the order…is that something that resembles table names that I see? Why, yes it is!

Now how useful is that?!

Anyways, have fun! 🙂

 

 

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4 Responses to Don’t Forget about Trace in Smart Office

  1. Pingback: Trace in Smart Office « M3 ideas

  2. Scott, is there a way to extract the Call Chain programmatically in a Smart Office Script? For example, suppose I opened CRS610 from OIS300 (for some reason), and suppose I have a script running in CRS610, how can the script tell the caller was OIS300?

    • potatoit says:

      Now that is a really good question.

      Mango.UI.Services.Applications.Trace provides a TraceService object, though I am not to sure where you get access to it from, and you’d need to instigate that at the beginning of the call chain.

      Making an assumption:
      Based on the Trace service only being from the point you hit start, forward, rather than being able to interrogate an already running application then I suspect that LSO itself doesn’t store the sequence, rather it is the business engine which effectively unwinds the calls – so the client is actually pretty ‘dumb’. It would be able to do this as you can see under the interactive sessions in ServerView/the Grid you can see all the parameters and the hierarchy of the calls.

      Maybe Karin would be prepared to shed some light on this?

      Cheers,
      Scott

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